Charlock Mustard, Wild Mustard

Sinapis arvensis

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sinapis (sin-NAP-is) (Info)
Species: arvensis (ar-VEN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Brassica arvensis
Synonym:Brassica kaber
Synonym:Brassica kaber var. pinnatifida

Category:

Herbs

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lakeside, California

Livermore, California

San Diego, California

Aspen, Colorado

Bronson, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 1, 2010, otter47 from Livermore, CA wrote:

One would think that this is a native plant. It seems to be in every field and every pasture in my region of California. It starts blooming in January and peaks now (early May -- end of the rainy season). In fact, the height of the wild mustard is a good indication of the winter rainfall. This year is a good rainfall year and the mustard is 6 feet high in many places,

Neutral

On Feb 18, 2005, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

A hairy, leafy plant with many racemes of yellow flowers at the ends of almost leafless branches.

Found along roadsides, in fields and old lots throughout the temperate agricultural regions of North America, from southern Canada to Central America.

A native of Eurasia, it's seeds have been used for mustard, but table mustard comes mostly from Black Mustard...Brassica nigra.

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