Digitalis Species, Fingerhut Foxglove, Spanish Foxglove

Digitalis thapsi

Family: Plantaginaceae
Genus: Digitalis (dig-ee-TAH-liss) (Info)
Species: thapsi (THAP-see) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Richmond, California

Parker, Colorado

Plano, Texas

Cathan, Washington

John Sam Lake, Washington

Kalama, Washington

North Marysville, Washington

Priest Point, Washington

Shaker Church, Washington

Stimson Crossing, Washington

Weallup Lake, Washington

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 5, 2006, seedpicker_TX from (Taylor) Plano, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

I am really pleased with this foxglove. It has proven a true perennial, even in our harsh Texas climate.

They seem pretty tough...they can take more sun than most foxglove, and I've even transplanted some with no stress.

Neutral

On Aug 28, 2002, Baa wrote:

A short lived perennial from Spain and Portugal.

Has rosettes of mid green, ovate or lace shaped leaves often covered in yellowish hairs (but not always). Bears small, pink, tubular flowers.

Flowers late May-July

Loves a slightly moist but well-drained soil in sun or light shade. It really hates winter-wet (I found to my detriment) and will promptly show it's disapproval by disappearing and never coming back!

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