Lupinus Species, Nootka Lupine

Lupinus nootkatensis

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lupinus (loo-PIE-nus) (Info)
Species: nootkatensis (noot-kuh-TEN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Lupinus albertensis
Synonym:Lupinus kiskensis
Synonym:Lupinus trifurcatus

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Blue-Violet

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Scarify seed before sowing

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Juneau, Alaska

Seward, Alaska

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 11, 2002, Weezingreens from Seward, AK (Zone 3b) wrote:

The Nooka lupine grows along roadsides, gravel bars, and forest clearings from the Aleutian Islands, southcentral Alaska, and along the Panhandle to B.C. Rigorous self-seeders, lupine can often be seen along roadsides and in open meadows, their bright blueish purple flowers catching ones eye from quite a distance. Their long tap roots make transplanting difficult, so sowing seed is preferable.

A member of the pea family, lupines form seeds in fuzzy pods that may be attractive to children. The seeds of the lupine can be toxic, though toxins flush through the system quickly and are not cumulative. However, internal use is not advised.

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