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Vaccinium Species, Bog Cranberry, European Cranberry, Small Cranberry,

Vaccinium oxycoccos

Family: Ericaceae (er-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Vaccinium (vak-SIN-ee-um) (Info)
Species: oxycoccos (ok-see-KOK-kohs) (Info)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Groundcovers

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Smooth

Provides Winter Interest

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

4.5 or below (very acidic)

4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Nome, Alaska

Petersville, Alaska

Trapper Creek, Alaska

South Ozone Park, New York

Devon, Pennsylvania

Port Matilda, Pennsylvania

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 7, 2016, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I've only seen this species at Jenkins Arboretum in their small bog area on the edge of a big pond. It is native to much of northern Eurasia and to most of Canada, Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, around the Great Lakes of the Midwest, the Mid-Atlantic, and New England. Its tiny leaves are rolled underneath along the edges and its fruit is smaller than the Big Cranberry, being only 1/4 to 1/2" in diameter verses 1/2 to 1.0" on the other species. It is supposed to be pollinated by bees and also is often self-fertile.

Positive

On Aug 31, 2004, tagati from Beiseker,
Canada wrote:

Collecting cranberries. Best to find a high mound of moss that has good sun exposure. Labrador tea, blueberries and pigeon berries(dogwood) are good indicators as to where to find bog cranberries. Berries are red on one side and white underneath. Berries lie right on the moss and later in the season are deep red all around. They only grow where there is moss.

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