Bay Willow, Laurel Willow

Salix pentandra

Family: Salicaceae (sal-i-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Salix (SAL-iks) (Info)
Species: pentandra (pen-TAN-druh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Provides Winter Interest

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From hardwood heel cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lisle, Illinois

Lincoln, Nebraska

Blakeslee, Pennsylvania

Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 10, 2019, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This Laurel Willow does have beautiful, very shiny foliage that is dark green with a yellow midrib, and leaves get to about 5 inches long by two inches wide. It is usually about 30 to 35 feet high, but can get up to 60 feet high in some special place. It is native to northern Europe and Asia, and has escaped cultivation in some local areas of the eastern US. So far, I have seen one planted specimen at Morton Arboretum in northeast Illinois and a number growing wild in swampy ground at one end of the Austin T. Blakeslee Natural Area in Blakeslee, Pennsylvania. Dr. Michael Dirr in his huge manual of Woody Landscape Plants reported that he saw a few in central Illinois in the 1980's or 1990's that lost all their leaves in August due to an outbreak of a leaf disease.

BACK TO TOP