Howell's Pussy-toes, Northern Pussytoes

Antennaria howellii

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Antennaria (an-ten-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: howellii (HOW-el-ee-eye) (Info)
Synonym:Antennaria grandis
Synonym:Antennaria neodioica
Synonym:Antennaria obovata
Synonym:Antennaria rhodantha
Synonym:Antennaria rupicola

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Evergreen

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Tilton, New Hampshire

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Nov 23, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This species of Antennaria is named in honor of John Thomas Howell (1842-1912), a collector of the flora of Oregon and Washington. Small white flowers appear in summer. Makes a nice rock garden plant.

Positive

On Jun 1, 2004, Linnea from Tilton, NH (Zone 4a) wrote:

The little gray-green leaves with their silver edges are quite pleasing - I may try this in the home gardens as a groundcover. It forms nice mats out in the pasture in the sandiest, poorest areas.

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