Campanula Species, Spreading Bellflower

Campanula patula

Family: Campanulaceae (kam-pan-yew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Campanula (kam-PAN-yoo-luh) (Info)
Species: patula (PAT-yoo-luh) (Info)
Synonym:Campanula brachiata
Synonym:Campanula brodensis
Synonym:Campanula chrysogonii
Synonym:Campanula csepeliensis
Synonym:Campanula decurrens

Category:

Annuals

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Medium Purple

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 29, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

Many consider this the most beautiful of all bellflowers. The common name refers to the spreading petals and not to any plant habit.

Flowers are held on slender, wiry stems (from 10 to 30") that need the support of neighbors to keep from lodging.

This is a self-sowing biennial, hardy in Z5-9. Seeds need light for germination. Forms a short, strong taproot the first year. Not for the hot humid summers of the southeastern US.

A meadow plant for full sun and lean dry well-drained soils, sandy or gravelly, that are not too acidic.

Native to temperate Europe and widely naturalized elsewhere. In the US, it has naturalized in NY, NH, MA, and CT. Found on roadsides, fallow fields, banks, and waste land showing human disturbance.

BACK TO TOP