Clitoria Species, Butterfly Pea Tree

Clitoria fairchildiana

Family: Fabaceae (fab-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Clitoria (klih-TOH-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: fairchildiana (fair-child-ee-AY-nuh) (Info)
Synonym:Centrosema spicata
Synonym:Clitoria racemosa
Synonym:Neurocarpum racemosum
Synonym:Ternatea racemosa

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Deciduous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Blue-Violet

Lavender

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 4, 2003, Monocromatico from Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil (Zone 11) wrote:

Beautiful tropical tree, reaching between 10-15m tall. The ramification starts quite low, so itīs an easy tree to climb up (if you are a nutty who likes to play on trees like me :^P). Needs full sun, regular watering, and doesnīt care much about the soil. Beautiful flowers in pendant spikes, sometimes blue-violet and white, others pink-violet and white. Produces lots of seeds with good germination rate, so given the right conditions, it could generate new plants by itself next year.

But this is a remarkably vulnerable tree to aphids. We got almost every Butterfly Pea tree in the city infested with it, and lots of good trees are dying fast. You SHOULD at all costs take care of this.

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