Wingpod Purslane

Portulaca umbraticola

Family: Portulacaceae
Genus: Portulaca (por-tew-LAK-uh) (Info)
Species: umbraticola (um-bruh-TEE-koh-luh) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Groundcovers

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Orange

Red-Orange

Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Smooth-Textured

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Gurley, Alabama

El Mirage, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona (2 reports)

Fayetteville, Arkansas

El Centro, California

Perris, California

Placentia, California

San Leandro, California

Orlando, Florida

Port Saint Lucie, Florida

Quincy, Florida

Hodgenville, Kentucky

Westlake, Louisiana

Houston, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Nov 29, 2012, Menk from Darling Downs,
Australia wrote:

Would anyone have the true species form of P. umbraticola growing in cultivation? All of the ones photographed here appear to be the modern cultivars, which are not species but actually apomictic cultivars resulting from selective outcrossing and hybridization.

Positive

On Jun 30, 2007, bugraooo from Port Saint Lucie, FL wrote:

This plant grows in a pot in my yard in south Florida and disappears after a few months. I thought this was because of the large amount of summer rainfall here. Now I think it just can't grow year round. Even in our frost free environment, it is an annual.

Positive

On Sep 12, 2003, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

San Antonio, TX
Sometimes sold incorrectly under the name of Portulaca oleracea, this portulaca is easily identifiable by the prominent margin on the fruit capsule. The flowers are small and open only part of the day and do not open fully on very cloudy days, like all portulaca. The name "Portulaca" is a derivative of "portare" (Latin) which means to carry and lac (milk) which refers to the plant's milky sap. Seeds are formed in a tiny pod which opens when the seeds are ready. My plants reseed themselves in late spring with some emerging in early summer. This is the "native" purslane. The flowers are 2/3 inch (1.5 cm) or less across and have 5 rounded petals with yellow at their base. As the temperatures begin to cool and the amount of daylight decreases, so does bloom production.... read more

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