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Species, Natural Hybrid Orchid, Giant Rattlesnake Plantain, Western Rattlesnake Plantain

Goodyera oblongifolia

Family: Orchidaceae (or-kid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Goodyera (GOOD-yer-uh) (Info)
Species: oblongifolia (ob-long-ee-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)
Additional cultivar information:(natural hybrid)
Synonym:Goodyera decipiens
Synonym:Goodyera decipiens

Category:

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Good Fall Color

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pale Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Crescent City, California

Spruce Pine, North Carolina

Dexter, Oregon

Bothell, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 28, 2004, chucks from Newland, NC (Zone 7a) wrote:

There are plenty of these here in the mountains of North Carolina

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