Cyphophoenix Species, Lifou Palm

Cyphophoenix nucele

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cyphophoenix (sy-foh-FEE-niks) (Info)
Species: nucele

Category:

Palms

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

This Plant is Critically Endangered (CR)

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Thousand Oaks, California

Cape Coral, Florida

Venice, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 10, 2006, cfkingfish from Venice, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

This palm should be more widely used in subtropical and tropical landscapes. It seems to love South Florida, and has been a faster grower for me than any other New Caledonian palm. It can be easily separated from its cousin C. elegans, as it takes a bit longer to go pinnate (7-8 leaves), and has a hint of color when the new leaf opens. It can even take just about full sun and still look pretty good here!

Positive

On Jan 24, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Finicky cousin of Cyphophoenix elegans, also from New Caledonia. This palm is slower still, and has less tolerance of cold, wind and sun than C elegans, and is not quite as ornamental in leaf. The leaves are pretty much flat, delicate and bright green, totally unlike C elegans. The crownshaft, however, has a nice white tomentum on it. It also has a nicely ringed trunk. Until recently it has been the more commonly cultivated plant as it has been more harvested. However, as people realize how nice C elegans is to grow, this one will soon be the rarer of the two.

For those living in southern California there is a trunking specimen (just starting to trunk 2006) in Quail Botanical gardens in the waterfall area... and it looks great.

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