White Elephant Palm, King Thai Palm

Kerriodoxa elegans

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Kerriodoxa (ker-ee-oh-DOKS-uh) (Info)
Species: elegans (ELL-eh-ganz) (Info)

Category:

Palms

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Fall/Early Winter

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Tucson, Arizona

Boca Raton, Florida

Lecanto, Florida

Loxahatchee, Florida

Miami, Florida

Orange Park, Florida

Port Charlotte, Florida

Venice, Florida (2 reports)

Hana, Hawaii

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

6
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 4, 2013, patk123 from Orange Park, FL wrote:

I planted one out by the road 6 yrs ago. It is doing great through all kinds of weather.

Positive

On Jun 19, 2008, wormfood from Lecanto, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

I'm going to Ocala tomorrow to buy one for 20 bucks. 10 minutes away from me is a little town called Old Homosassa. I call it Jurasicsassa because plants grow big and happy. They're probably 2' above sea level. I've seen one growing there and it's doing very well. I'm 110' above (now wait a minute, it's 110' for my well water, whatever that means) but I'm up high, it gets cold but I don't get frost. It should do good in a protected spot.
Jan.'09 Made it thru 39* night.

Positive

On Apr 20, 2008, billowen from Port Charlotte, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

I just planted one of these palms about a month ago in a shady wind protected area. I paid $70.00 for a small one, hope it does well here.Update May 2009, this one didn't last long for some reason. I'm trying again, this time in a large pot. Needs to be placed in a total wind protected area. I believe a good rich soil mix will work well. Planting this palm in non-amended soil in the ground as I did with the previous palm is a bad idea here. Update, July 2010, fast growth and doing well potted in a rich soil in a shady protected area inside my pool cage. Wind will shred the leaves.

Positive

On Feb 18, 2006, cfkingfish from Venice, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

I believe this is one of the more underrated palms for growing in zones 9b and up. The leaves are not too hardy to frost, but there are specimens of this plant growing in low 9b areas of Florida. The fronds tatter easily and this should not be planted in any windy areas.

Positive

On Aug 23, 2004, Kylecawaza from Corte Madera, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

This beatiful palm is tolerant of the zone 11 areas of CA, as well as the zone 10b's.

Positive

On Mar 4, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

ONe of the most beautiful understory fan palms there are. Great huge, well pleated nearly unsplit leaves with bright white underside and black petioles. From Thailand and a photo included is from the location of origin. This is definitely a palm for the tropics. It is slow even there, but does well in marginal, if humid, zones such as 9b-10a in Florida. However, here in Southern California this is a slug... in fact, so slow you often wonder if maybe it's still alive. It is hopeless in all but the best microclimates in zone 10b in So Cal, and even there growers soon become bored with it's inability to grow new leaves and look good. No mature plants will probably ever exist in southern California.

By the way, there is no zone 11 in California

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