Leucothrinax Species, Brittle Broom Palm, Key Thatch Palm

Leucothrinax morrisii

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Leucothrinax
Species: morrisii (mor-RIS-ee-eye) (Info)
Synonym:Thrinax morrisii

Category:

Trees

Palms

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Big Pine Key, Florida

Cape Coral, Florida

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Loxahatchee, Florida

Pompano Beach, Florida

Tavernier, Florida

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 11, 2017, Capegarrett from Cape Coral, FL wrote:

Great small palm. Slow growing. Looks great planted among other vegetation where the silver to almost white undersides of the leaves stand out in the slightest breeze. Should be more widely planted in Southwest Florida, though it can be seen as a street planting in a few areas here. Delicate looking in part sun.

Neutral

On Apr 3, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

One of the more common Thrinax seen in Florida- a smaller fan palm with deeply split leaves that have a whitish, silvery coloration on the undersides (compare this to more common T radiata). Native to the Florida Keys.

Officially put in its own genus, Leucothrinax, in 2008 (from Thrinax).

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