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Erythrina Species, Coral Tree

Erythrina sykesii

Family: Fabaceae (fab-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Erythrina (er-ith-RY-nuh) (Info)
Species: sykesii
Synonym:Erythrina x sykesii

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Deciduous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Red

Red-Orange

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Winter

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Apr 16, 2004, Maudie from Harvest, AL wrote:

I have the Erythrina crista-galli (Cockscomb: Cockspur; Coral Bean
Coral tree) and it dies back every fall to return in spring.
Seems like it would make a tree with huge red blooms but only gets to be a very large bush here in central AL. Has anyone had
experience with this plant they would like to share? Mine is the only plant like this that I know of in the vacinity. Any information will be appreciated.

Positive

On Apr 9, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Common hybrid that has naturalized in India and is on the international weed list, so it might be invasive. Has striking flowers that are symetrical and look a lot like E coralloides flowers: red to red-orange circular with curved spikes of red radiating out from the center- the whole flower is about 4-5" in diameter. Tends to flower in winter when it has no leaves. Leaves quickly return early spring.

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