Agave Species, Nevada Agave, Utah Agave, Century Plant, Yant

Agave utahensis var. nevadensis

Family: Asparagaceae
Genus: Agave (a-GAH-vee) (Info)
Species: utahensis var. nevadensis
Synonym:Agave nevadensis

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Fountain Hills, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

Carlsbad, California

Corona, California

Hesperia, California

Mission Viejo, California

Roswell, New Mexico

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes

Lindon, Utah

South Jordan, Utah

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Extremely ornamtental plant- has pale blue-green leaves with very large spines (not very sharp, though) and long, harmless terminal grass-like spines. This is the smallest and most cold hardy variety of this species, though I can't personally tell if from the utahensis ssp. Certainly one of the most ornamental of all the Agaves. Makes an excellent potted specimen. Suckers slowly and the suckers tend to be adhered to the mother plant... eventually forming a large matt of spines where you can't tell which leaf belongs to which plant. Funny how this plant is found in the California deserts, despite the name suggesting one or two other states of origin. It may be found there as well?

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