Kolpakowski's Tulip

Tulipa kolpakowskiana

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tulipa (TOO-li-pa) (Info)
Species: kolpakowskiana (kol-pa-kow-skee-AY-nuh) (Info)
» View all varieties of Tulips

Division:

Division 15 - Species

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Red

Gold (yellow-orange)

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Garberville, California

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 30, 2017, saya from Heerlen,
Netherlands (Zone 8b) wrote:

Origin of the hills to the Tien Shan mountains of Kazakhstan in the Altai Mountains on the border in northwest China. The single, but sometimes triple, yellow flowers with tapered petals are on the outside provided with pink red spots, the whole is surrounded by a haze of green. The anthers are yellow. The leaves are waved and pointed at the end.

Received the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the British Royal Horticultural Society in 1993.

Positive

On May 15, 2004, Howard_C from St John's, NL wrote:

This seems to be one of the easier small tulip species to grow. It has lasted well over 10 years in our St John's, Newfoundland garden (Can zone 5b). One bulb seems to have become trapped under a rock when we rebuilt the rock garden and has tried to escape every spring since, with some increase, it now appears on all sides of the rock. It can obviously survive without a summer baking since that is a missing feature of our climate! It comes from the mountains of central Asia. Kolpakowski was an early 20th century botanist-explorer who discovered several new tulip species in this area.

It is said to be a variable plant in the wild, but our form seems typical of those in cultivation; the contrast between the golden yellow inside and the peachy pink exterior is particularl... read more

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