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Silk Tassel Bush, Coast Silk Tassel, Wavyleaf Silktassel

Garrya elliptica

Family: Garryaceae
Genus: Garrya (GAR-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: elliptica (ee-LIP-tih-kuh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Silver/Gray

Bloom Time:

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Leathery-Textured

Provides winter interest

This plant is resistant to deer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From hardwood heel cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Francisco, California

San Leandro, California

Grants Pass, Oregon

Tangent, Oregon

Austin, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 27, 2010, nocowsallowed from Grnts Pass, OR (Zone 7a) wrote:

I dont have any personal exprience with growing this plant, but it is on campus at RCC in Grants Pass, Oregon. This is what I know about it...The catskins are from the male plant & the berries are produced on the female plants. They are a very drought tolerant plant so love full sun to partial shade. They dont require a lot of water or attention. They can be trained as living fences and make great sun screens, also train as a small tree if desired. Birds are very attracted to the female plant, where as the male plant is the most attractive for landscapping. At campus we have both male and female side by side. Hardwood and heel cuttings have been recommended to me and I have some starts to see what happens. These plants are native to the Northwest, but seldom used here--they are found in ab... read more

Positive

On May 17, 2004, angelam from melbourne,
Australia wrote:

Given this is an American tree I expected to find answers to my questions here, not to be making the first entry.

This is a handsome small tree with dark green wavy leaves, a bit like a holly without the points. Its long tassel flowers in dense clumps all over the tree, come when there's little else in the garden. It is pest free and all round a rewarding plant.

Mine is now out of shape, having been battered by footballs and boys climbing it to retrieve balls. It seems to hold the new position if ever a branch is bent rather than recovering its original shape. It also seems to send out numerous very vigorous and upright shoots if ever a substantial branch is cut back, which detracts from the graceful shape. I'd like to find out how to reshape and rejuvenate i... read more

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