Salvia, White Rosemary 'Albus'

Salvia rosmarinus

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Salvia (SAL-vee-uh) (Info)
Species: rosmarinus (rose-ma-REE-nus) (Info)
Cultivar: Albus
Additional cultivar information:(aka Albiflorus)
Synonym:Rosmarinus officinalis
» View all varieties of Salvias

Category:

Herbs

Shrubs

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood heel cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

By simple layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Riverside, California

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 14, 2016, rfowler4040 from Riverside, CA wrote:

I am thinking of adding a few of these along a east-facing slope. Can anyone tell me how wide they actually get? The internet is all over the place as far as their widths.

And when you say this is a less vigorous variety than the blue variety, does that mean that it appears more woody/leggy then the normal rosmarinus officinalis?

Thanks.

Positive

On Jan 20, 2006, timrann from Other,
Mauritius wrote:

This variety grows on almost any type of soil ( like others too i supose ), here it's on very sandy soil . The leaves are thicker , shorter and even less fragrance than the officinalis

Neutral

On May 24, 2004, Baa wrote:

A less vigorous variety of R. officinalis. Bears pure white flowers but can be used for the same purposes.

Flowers mainly between March to May and intermittently in late summer here in Southern England.

Loves a poorish to slightly fertile soil in full sun. The plant in my photo has been poorly looked after int he past couple of years so the leaves are more sparse than they should be. It will get a trim when the flowers are over and repotted in autumn. We've had this one in a pot for 6 years.

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