Lonicera Species, Limber Honeysuckle, Red, Twining Honeysuckle, Glaucous Honeysuckle, Mountain Honey

Lonicera dioica

Family: Caprifoliaceae (cap-ree-foh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info) (cap-ree-foh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lonicera (luh-NIS-er-a) (Info)
Species: dioica (dy-oh-EE-kuh) (Info)
Synonym:Lonicera dioica var. dioica
Synonym:Lonicera dioica f. dioica
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Shrubs

Vines and Climbers

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Red

Bright Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

By simple layering

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Casselberry, Florida

Fort Worth, Texas

Sterling, Virginia

Muscoda, Wisconsin

Onalaska, Wisconsin

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
3
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 9, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

BONAP shows this is common in the northeastern US and the upper midwest, but it doesn't occur in the western mountains.

Positive

On Jul 25, 2007, dkm65 from Cedar Falls, IA (Zone 4b) wrote:

Not as showy as trumpet honeysuckle (L. sempervirens), or some of the exotic invasives that shouldn't be grown in much of the country (e.g., Japanese [L. japonica], Tartarian [L. tartarica], & Amur [L. maackii]), but still very nice.

It isn't invasive in the U.S. It is a native to the Midwest, Northeast, & Mid-Atlantic, and much better mannered than the exotic invasives that can crowd out native species in many parts of the country. It (or one of its varieties) is endangered in Illinois, Kentucky, and Maine, and a plant of special concern in Tennessee and Rhode Island.

Besides limber honeysuckle, I've seen the following common names used: red honeysuckle, wild honeysuckle, twinning honeysuckle, glaucous honeysuckle, and mountain honeysuckle. A lot of so... read more

Neutral

On Feb 26, 2006, jimwil22 from rhinelander, WI (Zone 4a) wrote:

have found this honeysuckle growing wild in zone 3b, in two places, do not know how invasive it is.

Neutral

On Jan 13, 2005, Todd_Boland from St. John's, NL (Zone 5b) wrote:

This species is one of the few climbing vines found native in the mountains of western North America. The flowers open yellowish but age to orange-red. Hummingbirds will take advantage of them. Not as showy as many climbing honeysuckles, but still a worthwhile plant for a woodland planting.

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