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Candy Cane Palm

Dypsis paludosa var. florencei

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Dypsis (DIP-sis) (Info)
Species: paludosa var. florencei

Category:

Palms

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Huntington Beach, California

San Diego, California

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Venice, Florida

Mountain View, Hawaii

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 11, 2016, brachychiton from Bribie Island,
Australia wrote:

I've tried unsuccessfully to grow this lovely palm about 3 different times in South East Queensland, Australia (approx. Zone 10a - 11). I have very sandy soil, but have poured water into them, but I don't think it was enough to stop it drying out. This hasn't stopped me wanting to try again, but commonsense has prevailed so far.

Positive

On Jun 1, 2006, cfkingfish from Venice, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

This palm has been given the common name Candy Cane Palm for its leaf bases have a striking white/red contrast to them. It is unsure whether this palm and Dypsis paludosa are technically the same species. This is personally one of the better looking "ankle-biter" Dypsis in my opinion.

Positive

On May 31, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

smaller sucking understory palm from Madagascar who's identity is still really unknown. Brought into cultivation maybe just 5-7 years ago, this palm has been very popular with growers because of the bright pinkish-red color in the stems below the leaves. It has only slightly split pinnate leaves that are bright green and open up right of the stems (no petioles at all!). I have seen this for sale many times here in So Cal, but I am not sure if anyone has had success yet growing it here outdoors. Hope so, as it's a gorgeous plant. Plants in Hawaii now large enough to be flowering, and palm has finally been officially given this species name. Looks a lot like a few other palms, such as Dypsis faneva.. .but that bright red crownshaft really sets it apart. There are entire, bifid leaf fo... read more

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