Atherton Palm

Laccospadix australasica

Family: Arecaceae (ar-ek-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Laccospadix (lak-oh-SPAY-diks) (Info)
Species: australasica (aw-stra-LAY-see-kuh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Palms

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Thousand Oaks, California

Ventura, California

Westminster, California

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 9, 2012, martianus from Tauranga,
New Zealand wrote:

I have this palm growing in Tauranga, New Zealand.
It grows slowly but strongly, is about 16 feet tall after
nine years and is currently flowering. Climate here
is warm temperate with some sub tropical elements,
but is strictly maritime. It is growing in volcanic soil.

Positive

On Jun 7, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Great palm from Australia where it grows as a solitary or clustering pinnate species. Closely related to kentia palms (Howea)... in fact, was going to be included in same genus, but for some reason it wasn't. Has very similar flowers- long arching dangling single inflorescences covered in seed. The solitary species tends to have a bright red new leaf and is reportedly a bit more fastidious and cold tender, while the suckering forms have only a hint of red in the new leaves. Great indoor plant.

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