Calochortus Species, Beavertail Grass, Lavender Star Tulip

Calochortus coeruleus

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Calochortus (kal-uh-KOR-tus) (Info)
Species: coeruleus (ko-er-OO-lee-us) (Info)
Synonym:Calochortus maweanus
Synonym:Cyclobothra coerulea

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Bulbs

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Foliage:

Deciduous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Lavender

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From bulbils

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 22, 2004, Lophophora from Tokyo,
Japan wrote:

Calochortus coeruleus var. coeruleus is another mountain bulb found only in California, from Lassen County south to Amador County in the Sierra Nevadas, at elevations between 1000 and 2200 meters, usually growing on west-facing wooded slopes in clay loam or gravel. It is one of the hardier members of the genus, and is reputed to dislike too much heat during its summer dormancy.

Sometimes confused with C. elegans and C. tolmiei, this plant has oblong anthers, and the petals are not papillose on the inner surface. All three species have petals more or less covered with white hairs, while C. coeruleus' become lavender towards the nectary.

There is one recognized varietas: C. coeruleus var. fimbriatus.

... read more

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