Cleome Species, Rocky Mountain Bee Plant

Cleome serrulata

Family: Cleomaceae
Genus: Cleome (klee-OH-me) (Info)
Species: serrulata (ser-yoo-LAY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Atalanta serrulata
Synonym:Cleome inornata
Synonym:Cleome integrifolia
Synonym:Peritoma angusta
Synonym:Peritoma serrulata

Category:

Annuals

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Chartreuse/Yellow

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Flagstaff, Arizona

Peridot, Arizona

Denver, Colorado

Fort Collins, Colorado

Fort Garland, Colorado

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Austin, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 12, 2012, petset77 from Fort Garland, CO (Zone 4b) wrote:

Positive rating because it is a lovely flowering plant during summer in the high desert of the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado. Where it has self sown, there are clusters of them. They seem to like recently disturbed barren soil of roadsides. They bloom profusely, and set many seed pods. But like many cleome that I've tried, only a small percentage of seed will germinate. The seed must be totally ripe, and have turned black. White seed does not sprout. I've gotten a few to start, trying different moisture levels, different soil mixes. Once started, they grow with little care. Definitely a plant to try, but don't be disappointed if they don't germinate.

Neutral

On Mar 2, 2005, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

This plant produces a great amount of nectar which attracts bees...hence, the common name.

Native Americans boiled the strong leaves for food and to treat stomachaches. In times of drought, Spanish-Americans made tortillas from the barely edible, but nourishing seeds.

It is found on the plains, rangelands and the foothills of the lower mountains of Eastern WA, northeast CA,central AZ and the plains of Saskatchewan south to TX.

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