Prunus Species, Holly-Leaf Cherry

Prunus ilicifolia

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Prunus (PROO-nus) (Info)
Species: ilicifolia (il-liss-ee-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Textured

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Long Beach, California

Malibu, California

San Diego, California

San Gabriel, California

Vista, California(9 reports)

Yorba Linda, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 23, 2017, manza from Long Beach, CA (Zone 10b) wrote:

This is a California evergreen native plant. The berries should not be eaten by people since the pits have cyanide in them. (See Carol Bornstein et al, "California Native Plants for the Garden", p. 156.) Birds may eat them, although the berries have very little flesh on them.

Neutral

On Sep 8, 2014, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

this shrub grows here in the drought-striken high desert where we have gotten maybe 6" or rain in two years... yet looks as happy as ever. They are growing all over here at about 3000'. Trees are full of cherries in end of summer, but they are an acquired taste, not to mention their pits are about 98% of the volume of the entire fruit. Would take a LOT of cherries to fill up on. Skin is a bit leathery and bitter, too... but still, they are somethings you can 'eat' in the desert when there is nothing else.

After wandering through the brush for several hours it becomes clear that little, if anything, is eating these cherries, other than me. No signs of bird damage (my own cherries at home disappear almost the second they show any red coloration, thanks to bird predation).... read more

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