Whitebeam

Sorbus aria

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sorbus (sor-bus) (Info)
Species: aria (AR-ee-a) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 1, 2009, DMersh from Perth,
United Kingdom (Zone 7b) wrote:

Saw lots of these in an old chalk quarry, they seem to do well on very poor and alkaline soil, there wasn't really any proper soil at all where they were, just a thin layer of broken down chalk. Very striking tree, with dark bark and contrasting pale green leaves.

Positive

On Dec 3, 2004, Todd_Boland from St. John's, NL (Zone 5b) wrote:

Lovely small tree; the leaves emerge silvery but then the upper surface becomes shiny green while the lower surface remains felted in silver-white. Small clusters of white flowers develop into orange-red berries that are very attractive to birds. If space is limited, then this would make a good ornamental tree.

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