Salvia, Rosemary 'Gorizia'

Salvia rosmarinus

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Salvia (SAL-vee-uh) (Info)
Species: rosmarinus (rose-ma-REE-nus) (Info)
Cultivar: Gorizia
Synonym:Rosmarinus officinalis
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Category:

Herbs

Shrubs

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Light Blue

Medium Blue

Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy

Provides Winter Interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood heel cuttings

By simple layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

San Anselmo, California

Jackson, Michigan

Austin, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Houston, Texas

Manchaca, Texas

Spring, Texas

Langley, Washington

North Sultan, Washington

Sultan, Washington

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Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 26, 2012, PerennialConnection from Albion, MI (Zone 6a) wrote:

I don't completely trust the zone 5 rating...however, it did survive in my yard this last winter (2011-12) without ANY fussing or winterizing.

I would describe my back yard area as a zone 6b micro-climate. The temperature might even be closer to zone 7 most times. It is densely packed residential with house foundations no more than 20' in any direction. That being said, there is more moisture than most Mediterranean regions get in early spring. I think that fact has the most damaging effects on plants like rosmarinus.

I have my rosemary planted in a region of my yard that is slightly elevated, bordered by sidewalk & driveway, and VERY rocky. It stays quite dry most of the time. With the exception of a "normal" spring.

In the winter of 2010-11... read more

Positive

On Oct 7, 2006, renwings from Sultan, WA (Zone 8a) wrote:

Very attractive shape. The flavor is excellent for cooking. Long, straight stems are quite sturdy.
As far as hardiness goes, I don't know about the zone 5 rating, the tag from the nursery which came with the plant indicates its hardy down to 0 degrees. But that is still excellent for Rosemary!

ETA:
This past winter we had a very cold spell. The overnight temperature got down in the teens and we nearly had a foot of snow that stuck for more than a week. This rosemary survived with a little bit of damage on the tips, but bloomed nonetheless.

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