Lewisia Species, Short-Sepal Bitter-root, Shortsepal Lewisia

Lewisia brachycalyx

Family: Montiaceae
Genus: Lewisia (lew-ISS-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: brachycalyx (brak-ee-KAL-iks) (Info)
Synonym:Lewisia brachycarpa
Synonym:Oreobroma brachycalyx

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 9, 2004, Todd_Boland from St. John's, NL (Zone 5b) wrote:

This lewisia species goes summer dormant ( much like L. pygmaea, L. nevadensis and L. longipetala). The plants send up a small rosette of narrow, fleshy leaves early in spring and has white or pale pink flowers in April-June, then the plant promtly disappears until next spring. Nice for a humusy scree or alpine trough, but mark where you planted it. It is native to the mountains of Arizona and S. California. It is one of the more tender species.

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