Haworthia Species

Haworthia mirabilis

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Haworthia (ha-WORTH-ee-a) (Info)
Species: mirabilis (mih-RAB-ih-liss) (Info)
Synonym:Aloe mirabilis
Synonym:Apicra mirabilis
Synonym:Catevala mirabilis
Synonym:Haworthia retusa var. mirabilis

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Velvet/Fuzzy

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From leaf cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Valley Center, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
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0
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RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 27, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- My Haworthia mirabilis mandala is only 2 years old but is doing well planted in the ground. It first bloomed in September 2014. The location is in partial shade, in the lee of a large rock. It gets once-a-month water in summer and none in winter. Winter protection is limited to downed deciduous tree leaves and the 26 F in late December 2014 did not seem to affect it adversely.

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