Citrus Hybrid, Bergamot Orange

Citrus bergamia

Family: Rutaceae (roo-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Citrus (SIT-rus) (Info)
Species: bergamia
Synonym:Citrus aurantium subsp. bergamia

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Aromatic

Smooth-Textured

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Morro Bay, California

Pompano Beach, Florida

North Charleston, South Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 13, 2017, DaylilySLP from Dearborn Heights, MI (Zone 6a) wrote:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Citrus bergamia, the bergamot orange, is a fragrant citrus fruit the size of an orange, with a green color similar to a lime.

Genetic research into the ancestral origins of extant citrus cultivars found bergamot orange to be a probable hybrid of Citrus limon and Citrus aurantium.
Extracts have been used to scent food, perfumes, and cosmetics. Use on the skin can increase photosensitivity, resulting in greater damage from sun exposure; excessive consumption can be toxic.

Neutral

On Sep 25, 2009, gooley from Hawthorne, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

Never grown it, but I get conflicting reports of hardiness on line, including the claim on Wikipedia that it grows in Georgia (the one in the US, that is) -- commercially, it's implied. I don't know of any part of Georgia that is zone 9b.

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